Globalisation world becoming smaller which strengthens social interactions all

Globalisation can be defined as the progression of the world becoming smaller which strengthens social interactions all over the world as a result of advanced technology and diminishing significance of borders between states (Giddens, 1991; Larsson, 2001). Globalisation has also increased the perception of the world as a unity due to the growing dependence between countries (Baylis & Smith, 2001; Robertson, 1992), affecting almost all aspects of the society, such as economics, politics, and cultural. In addition, migration is also one of the most noticeable aspects of globalisation: rising numbers of individuals moving within countries and across borders, in search of better job opportunities and lifestyles (International Institute for Environment and Development, 2001). Most migrants worldwide come from developing countries (157 million in 2015), and the majority were living in high-income countries (United Nations, 2016). However, it is not easy to find official jobs, therefore some people, mainly women in this case, are pressured to look for other options such as sex work (Ward & Aral, 2006). Sex work can be described as a trade of sexual services for material compensation, including direct physical contact amongst consumers and sellers along with indirect sexual stimulation (Weitzer, 2000). Most sex workers are female but male and transgender can also be in the sex industry, and the limitations of sex work can be unclear, varying between erotic shows without direct physical interaction with the buyer, to high risk unprotected sexual intercourse with many clients (Harcourt & Donovan, 2005). Kinds of sex work vary from street prostitution to indoor prostitution such as escort services, brothel work, massage parlour-related prostitution, bar or casino prostitution, whereas indirect contact include interactions such as phone sex operation, lap dancing, webcam nude modelling, and pornographic film performing (Harcourt & Donovan, 2005). In the past 30 years the term “sex work” has been used, generally addressing all types of sexual commerce in an attempt to decrease the stigma associated with the term “prostitution” and to express professionalism (Kissil & Davey, 2010). However, this term is seen as problematic as it acknowledges that prostitution is an acceptable form of work.

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